Case Study: Learning and Development Framework

Building a Learning and Development Framework in a Global Bank

Summary

If you have ever worked in a large global organisation then you’ll know that the centralised Learning and Development function is responsible for promoting and providing a variety of interventions through a number of channels Typically these interventions are generic and span multiple levels of ability as they usually service the majority of needs across the organisation and there tends to be an overwhelming number of solutions to choose from. This was the dilemma facing one our global clients when they came to us for advice on how to navigate the vast amount of complex learning and development solutions that were available. The client was a technology organisation of a large global bank that supported the Global Banking and Markets business and was therefore organised geographically across three main hubs in London, New York and Hong Kong.

 

Scope

Our client wanted a solution that would support the need to develop as well as retain their staff now and in the future; in short a Learning and Development Framework that would:

  • Join-up all the appropriate L&D initiatives/activities that existed across GBM IT globally
  • Centralise the L&D options available
  • Evolve with the strategic requirements of GBM IT
  • Map learning and development to group capabilities and roles/job families across all levels within the GBM IT organisation
  • Define the skills progression matrix for the whole of GBM IT
  • Align to other strategic people initiatives that were taking place or scheduled for the future
  • Create a one-stop-shop for all L&D requirements; providing clarity and understanding for all Users

Furthermore they wanted the end result to be ready for global delivery and implementation before the end of the year so that it could be used to support the end of year appraisal process as well as the re-launch of a global talent initiative.

 

Solution

Based on our previous experience of this type of situation, we knew that in order to successfully define and implement a Learning and Development Framework that would be deemed useful and add value by its Users it would need to be:

  • Firmly anchored and aligned to the overall strategic intention of the GBM IT organisation
  • “In tune” with the performance management/appraisal process
  • Informed by the current and future capabilities and competencies required to run the organisation

 

Based on our previous experience of this type of situation, we knew that in order to successfully define and implement a Learning and Development Framework that would be deemed useful and add value by its Users it would need to be:

  • Firmly anchored and aligned to the overall strategic intention of the GBM IT organisation
  • “In tune” with the performance management/ appraisal process
  • Informed by the current and future capabilities and competencies required to run the organisation

Whilst we had had an initial conversation regarding L&D across GBM IT it was still unclear just what the current situation was in relation to what was and wasn’t available across the organisation, where it was held, who “owned” it and how it could be made accessible to everyone. It was important to our client that we demonstrated our recommendations in a logical way that would clearly illustrate the life cycle of the project together with key deliverables. We broke down our recommendations in to five defined phases, each phase outlining the time it was anticipated to take along with the outputs and deliverables for each of the phases. Our first phase resulted in defining the overall architecture for the framework, the schematic for how the framework would fit into the overall GBM IT People Strategy and the roadmap for implementation. Additionally these outputs helped us to outline the Communication and Education Plan for implementation as well as the stakeholder engagement map. In the second and third phases we focused on capturing and cataloguing all the data relating to any L&D activity that was available regardless of location or type (technical and non-technical) and identified duplication/replication of effort. Through a series of structured interviews and user group sessions we ran across the global teams, we were able to add content and context to the learning maps and skills progression matrix which would form the overall L&D framework for GBM IT. It was in phase three that we determined the preferred way in which users wanted to access this information would be through a centralised Portal on the global GBM IT website. With this established we recommended that the internal web design team build the technical solution to house a fully interactive L&D framework. When phase three was well underway and user acceptance testing was nearing its final cycle of scenario testing, IDG commenced phase four and undertook detailed global implementation planning.  This resulted in the production of:

  • A detailed implementation timetable
  • The communication and education plan
  • All supporting documentation (process maps, L&D policy etc.)
  • On-line toolkits and education literature
  • Training workshops

Phase five was concerned with “going live” and embedding the framework into the culture and people processes within the organisation. We consciously planned to build self-sufficiency at the right time for the client so that handover and transfer of ownership and responsibility to key individuals internally was consistently successful across their global footprint.

 

Results

Taking a phased approach that insisted on performing current state analysis and engaging with the users early in the project lifecycle meant that IDG were able to make a credible recommendation in a short space of time for a solution that worked across the complex technologies of the global locations. Not only did the outputs from the analysis and diagnostic phase help create the blueprint for the solution, they also enabled IDG to predict the overall timeline for implementation with confident accuracy; cutting the expected timeline by two months and therefore reducing the spend by approx. $45K. Most importantly the client benefitted from having a solution that was not only centralised, technically driven and bespoke but it had been specifically user defined which meant it catalogued the L&D activities in an intuitive and time efficient way. As an added benefit the solution was designed with a bank-wide technology initiative in mind that was being planned to map all technology roles to specific job families; creating greater clarity across the types and sizes of roles within the technology organisation. IDG deliberately built into the GBM IT learning paths a view of all the transferable skills for each of the roles within the different asset classes that the teams supported. This enabled the GBM IT organisation to illustrate progression maps as well as learning maps for all the teams across the global footprint at the click of a button. In conclusion IDG created a solution that not only saved significant money and time, increased accuracy of selecting the relevant role specific learning and development initiatives, defined the key elements of the future people strategy for GBM IT but implemented a blueprint that was truly inspirational and led the way for the rest of the technology organisation.

Facts

Industry: Bank
Location: Global
Solution: Implementation of a Learning and Development Framework